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Sunday, September 18, 2011

Cock-a-doodle-ooing All Day Long

Before I embarked on the crazy journey of hatching our chooks from fertile eggs last year, I did think about the roosters we were bound to get.  And I had a chat with Mr. P our neighbour. Mr P. has a couple of goats and lots of veggies and he is the font of all garden wisdom being an old timer from Italy. Anyway, he was keen to take any roosters we hatched. He has family with a farm. He also had a rooster wandering about his place. Which is against the rules but I wasn't about to get all rule-obsessed when my dreams for egg-hatching were being realised.

Anyway, lucky for us we only managed two roosters amongst the whole lot and when I was pretty sure they were roosters, I handed them over and tried not to look back. I wasn't entirely sure that Mr. P wouldn't cook them up in a silkie stew. But he didn't. And he didn't send them to his family on the farm either. He has kept them wandering about on his block. And I know this because they crow all bloody day long. This morning at 5.56am I heard their morning call. Which was kinda nice. That's the sort of noise we ought to wake up to in the mornings I reckon. And it makes a pleasant intermission from the sounds of trucks that start thundering past our window at 6am every morning.

Trouble is those roosters don't stop crowing. I hear them over breakfast and over lunch. Whenever I step foot in the backyard I hear them. It's not that the noise is annoying. No. Annoying is a yapping little dog that's been locked out of the house on the other side of the fence. That's a sound that sets my teeth grinding. No, it's not annoyance, it's shamefaced guilt.

I am responsible for those roosters and I suspect they're unhappy. There are too many of them. Surely you should keep only one rooster? I wonder whether he has kept true to his word and found wives for those roosters or if they're all just frustratedly crowing out for some hanky panky with the chooks a few chook hop, step, squawks away at my place. Their crowing brings back uncomfortable memories of my schoolgirlhood. I had the misfortune of attending a Catholic girls' school. There were Catholic boys too but they were fenced off in their own part of the school. And every now and again we would be subjected to the long walk from our school to their school past their classroom windows on the way to chapel. And did those gangs of boys act like a bunch of frustrated roosters. They'd crow and hang out the window and shout obscenities as we tripped past all red-faced and giggly.

Oh I know it's not right to coop boys up together.

But being the gutless veggiegobber I am, I haven't broached the subject with Mr.P. I feel guilty enough as it is. What if his farm-family didn't want the roosters and the constant crowing is starting to grate on his nerves. What if he decides that the best option is to cook them up?

No, I have reverted back to my schoolgirl ways, putting my head down and pretending not to hear them.  Certainly I won't be asking any questions when I bump into Mr P. tending his spring crops in the front yard in the near future.

13 comments:

  1. Steal one back...he won't notice...you can say it flew over the fence. Your guilt will be assuaged, one rooster will be joyous, the hens will get laid, eggs will get laid, maybe you will get chickens, you will get hours of enjoyment watching the goings on of the rooster and his girls...go on, go on, I dare you!

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  2. What a dilemma veggiegobbler :(

    You know I dont think silkies are very good for eating...we had silkie roosters and we never ate them. Their meat is really dark, not appealing at all! So hopefully they are safe from the "chop".

    Maybe they are crowing because they are happy :)

    Thinking of the positives, you dont need an alarm clock lol!

    Roosters are very territorial so that is why they crow...to let every one know that this is my territory and that I am present!

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  3. for your interest

    http://www.grit.com/Animals/Secret-of-the-Roosters-Crow.aspx

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  4. Tania, thanks for the link. Very interesting. Explains it all. Those roosters are busy shouting the others off their patch. Oh no Hazel I am a law abiding citizen!

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  5. We have one rooster and I have about three posts now about it driving me crazy. They just do crow all the time!!
    kim

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  6. A couple of years ago VG, I bought a pair of guinea fowl. They were lovely looking creatures, and had the most fabulous call I've ever heard. Well a few months after congratulating myself on my marvelous purchase, one of them was killed by the dog a few doors up.

    Well.

    Did its mate call.

    And call.

    And call.

    And boy, did it set my teeth on edge. Do you remember that day the sky went all red? There was a dust storm I don't know where from, and the whole sky just went red. Well that was the day I just went nutty from one too many calls.

    I bundled that thing into a horse feed bag, stuffed it into the car and took it back to where I'd got it from. I was honestly ready to leave in on the side of the road if they wouldn't take it back, which is not me at all - I am a responsible pet owner. But its call was driving me that mad.

    My goodness. Now that I have written my epic I'm not really sure what my point was.

    I went to Catholic school too :#

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  7. Oh no! I'm with you, completely gutless of face to face confrontation.

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  8. Life in a farm can be pretty hard, I remember grandma keeping only one rosters (and cooking the others), now I see my veggies aunt and uncle straggling with more than one, and poor chickens, at one stage my uncle had 3 rooster and one chuck, her back was bare poor thing... you either give them lots of space or lots of girlfriends...

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  9. Good luck with it VG! I don't have any tips...

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  10. Really enjoyed reading through your blog - and the photographs are great!

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