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Monday, November 14, 2011

Mulch and Paths and Not-So-Brilliant Ideas

Bean structures for fern canopy
I quickly got cracking on my brilliant idea. Unfortunately, Mark in his comments to my post was right. Whopping big pots cost a whopping lot of money. But I already have a ginormous lovely blue pot in the corner of my herb patch. My friend gave it to me for a birthday. Trouble is, it's filled and has flowering snap dragons growing in it. Also, some little amaranth seedlings that I've been nurturing for weeks have finally taken off directly in front of the pot. So I was cautious about moving it but impatient to start the job so thought I'd give it a go anyway. Completely unsuccessfully of course. You'd need to be on strong steroids to shift that thing and the trolley was threatening to snap under it's weight.

So I gave up on that idea and headed to my local barn. I settled on a couple of moderately big pots and maybe next year I'll empty the whopper pot and relocate it in front of the fernery too. Hazel also pointed out a teeny flaw in my fabulous idea. If I managed to grow a pumpkin (and judging from last year's efforts it was a long shot) I was likely to be knocked unconscious by it dropping on my head as I exited the back door. It would need to be a rather sound structure to hold the weight of pumpkins and I only have experience building flimsy structures that I'm forever fixing after a storm. Nope, on second thoughts my brilliant idea wasn't so brilliant. So I've taken 500M2's advice and have planted some beans in the pots. I'm hoping they will provide at least some shade for the ferns. And I planted the pumpkins up the back hoping they'll climb the kids' slide and the chook shed.

If only I could manage to get a bean to germinate and grow more than 5cm without being chomped by a snail. Mrs Bok and my fellow bloggers recommended Lazy Housewife beans when we were at our  Bloggers' Meet the other weekend so that's what I've planted. And their name really appeals to me naturally.

Since finishing the kids' bedroom renovation I've been the laziest housewife ever. I've retreated to the garden instead and have been in a frenzy of de-grassing and path-making. Remember when I unearthed a brick path a couple of weeks ago? Well I worked a few blisters onto my hands extending the path. We have loads of recycled bricks stacked up against our shed wall. So I managed to make a bit of a dent in those and overcome my fear of red-back spiders in the process. And I also dug up a fair bit of the grass along the way.
Extended path with emerging corn patch in the foreground
I'm thinking I might lash out and get some euca mulch to mulch the remaining paths and maybe also the sitting-about spots too. I remember my mum using it on her garden quite a few years ago and it looked good and felt lovely and soft underfoot. Has anyone else used it? What do you reckon?

14 comments:

  1. Gee, it's looking fantastic. I got a whole pile of eucy mulch from the contractors when they were clearing the trees after the fires. I have been using it on the paths in my veggie patch and it works well. I put down thick layers of newspaper first. Some people use it on gardens too, but as it breaks down it uses up nitrogen so, in that case, it is necessary to put down some sort of fertilizer first.

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  2. Path looks awesome! Think maybe I need to get my butt into gear and be doing our mulched pathways and rearrange the brick stepping stones too!

    Lucky you have such good blogging buddies to help your 'brilliant' idea reach it's full potential!

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  3. Looks great VG! I love that you have only blue pots. Its very cohesive despite the different shapes and textures. I hope the beans grow for you.

    What Hazel said RE Euca mulch. It tends to be very uniformed in shape and can be $$ depending where you get it from. We use bush mulch which is all different sizes and breaks down slower.
    Euca mulch makes a dense mat as the chips lock together. The only downside of this is that its not as permeable to light rain as a coarse mulch is, but considering the much is for a path, that should be fine!

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  4. Looking great. I love your huge pots.

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  5. I love all the interesting areas in your garden, and the paths are gorgeous.

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  6. You are a hardworking gardener /builder/garden designer. it is all looking lovely.

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  7. "No pain, no gain" they say. Looks like your garden has gained a lot! I like the choice of beans for growing in your pots. I had some "Lazy Housewife" this year. They produced some lovely big creamy white beans - though you can eat the immature pods too, like Runners.

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  8. Wow you have been busy in the garden, i love all the little spots which have seats tucked away great spot to hide with a good book. Ive used gravel as a mulch on paths around veggie beds but found them to hard when kneeling to weed etc, so i have tried sawdust which has worked well and soft underfoot/knees and seems to sprout lots of little self sow seedlings!

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  9. All looks so different to what it was! Looks like you'll have a beautiful path to saunter come summer with corn hens and beans to visit along the way! Totally exciting. Red backs can stay away though eeeeerk!

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  10. Looking good VG. The paths are lovely and organic. I've got lazy housewife in here too and some purple king and borlotti from my Italian neighbour.

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  11. oh I love those brick paths - and great to use up what you have hanging around.

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  12. I don't know euca mulch so I couldn't comment, but I can say that you cannot be a lazy housewife if you have been working in the garden :-)!

    Ciao
    A.

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  13. I love your path! Your benches look great as well.

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  14. Love the path, looks like you've been hard at work to me, nothing lazy about it. You'll have to post some before and after shots soon.

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