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Tuesday, September 25, 2012

The Great Sprout Experiment

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I bought a packet of sprout seeds a year ago and never grew any. Probably because it required a jar and a bit of muslin and a little research reminder about how to grow them. So they sat in my seed box reprimanding me for my wastefulness and laziness.

And then the other week, with the beginning of spring, I got all inspired and excited about growing them. Along with a renewed interest in getting 30 minutes of exercise a day and eating healthily... oh and keeping the house tidy, never shouting at the monkeys, watching less telly... I kinda make all my new year's resolutions at the start of spring. Doesn't last long.

Anyway, I got myself a jar and popped in a couple of tablespoons of seeds, let them soak overnight and the next day started my twice daily vigil of rinsing and draining. I also tried to inspire the little monkeys to get excited by them.
"Oh sprouts. I'm sure you love sprouts". I told them.
"So healthy".
"And look they will grow right in this jar in a matter of days".
"And then we can have them in sandwiches. And salads."
"So healthy".

The monkeys glanced my way and nodded. And then proceeded to show not the slightest bit of interest in those growing sprouts for the entire week.

By about day five, my sprouts had all sprouted and were filling the jar. So that morning I chirpily thrust the jar under the little monkeys' noses hoping they would oooh and aaah at the wonder of nature. But they grunted. And when I suggested that I put some sprouts in their sandwiches that day for lunch they both politely declined.

So I decided that I should probably start eating those sprouts instead. But the idea of munching on a sprout did not make my mouth water. In fact I could think of nothing I would prefer to eat less than a bunch of sprouts. But sprouts are sooooo healthy I reminded myself. And I had grown them and no-one else was going to eat them so surely I could think of something tasty to do? But when I opened the jar and looked closely, I discovered spores of mould growing all over the place. I think I had too many sprout seeds in too small a jar and there hadn't been enough air circulating.

So with a sneaky feeling of relief, I chucked the lot to the chooks. Who went completely crazy with excitement.

Sprouts make good chook food.


17 comments:

  1. That's great....made me laugh. Good to hear that the chooks liked them. I did a similar thing growing kohlrabi - after lots of effort decided that I hate it. And growing stuff that you like to eat is kind of the idea (although every now and then I am still tempted to grow stuff I don't like to eat).

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  2. Oh, VG you and I are like soul-sisters. A while back, I even bought a whizz-bang, three-tiered, plastic seed sprouting device. You were supposed to pour water in the top and it would seep through to the other layers...with seeds all at different stages of sprouting. You used the bottom tier, then replaced it at the top with new seeds. Fantastic. But it didn't work, they just smelled disgusting!

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  3. He he he. I now feel a lot better abou that seed packet that has sat in my seed box for a good year. Should have been more suspicious when my mum gave it to me...

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  4. Oh this is very funny! I too have a bunch of seeds sitting in my pantry ready to sprout, but I havent sprouted .... Perhaps I will wait till I have chookies?

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  5. hhaaahhhaaa.....you are funny...yukky sprouts, I agree with the monkeys.

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  6. Oh what a shame - seriously. I love some types of sprout, such as the mung bean (the beansprouts so favoured in Chinese cooking), and I also like alfalfa used as a "microgreen" garnish or a sandwich filler. But as you have seen, they can easily go wrong. Maybe next time it should be Brussels Sprouts for you?

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  7. I'm with you on this one VG. It seems like a good idea at the time. I had one of those 3 tier things years ago ........

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  8. That's so good VG. I know they're healthy too but so much commitment. Lucky chookies.

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  9. Aww, what a pity! But with chooks there is no waste! I have a love/hate relationship with sprouts - I love them in just one type of salad, but its such a chore to make I hardly ever bother with it.

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  10. Oh I'm with you VG (and the monkeys), sprouts do nothing for me, other than bean sprouts perhaps. I used to by others and put the in super healthy wraps for lunch then I realised my lunch tasted like cardboard with about the same texture and those stupid sprouts always ended up stuck in my teeth. Now I eat what I want and enjoy it.

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  11. Oh I am so sad.... but I have a suggestion. Try it again, this time with just 1 tablespoon of sunflower seeds or mung beans. Gosh, I wish you could come over and try mine. If you still don't think they are great, put them onto a bowl of soup or a stir fry.

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  12. Maybe you will get the benefits of the sprouts via the chickens.... Feed the chickens, eat the eggs.

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  13. HAHAHAHAHA!! I did that too! It's exciting watching them grow but...baahhhhhhhh. Yup great chook food!

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  14. Mmmm...I would have the same response with my children as well :).

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  15. Those monkeys are very smart as soon as they heard the word "healthy" not to bother !!

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  16. Sometimes that happens,it's easier with the little layered trays you can purchase .They don't seem to get smelly.

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  17. my kids loooove sprouts and do like a sprout sandwich. I'm rather partial myself so long as they are mould free. Maybe try alfalfa sprouts - they're so mild and crunchy.

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